mush
Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Mushrooming (Seenelkäik)

Steve Williams reviews Toomas Hussar’s directorial debut MUSHROOMING, a satire on the conflict between social decency and people’s true and hidden natures.

tab2
Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Taboor

Low-key absurdity, atmospheric isolation and melancholic anti-thrills. Paul Milne reviews Vahid Vakilifar’s TABOOR at the Edinburgh International Film Festival.

before
Monday, June 24, 2013

Before Midnight

What happens to Jesse and Celine after they walk into the sunset? Their climactic interaction is darkly sincere and immensely entertaining, writes Lillie Davidson.

chamel
Sunday, June 23, 2013

The Color of the Chameleon

THE COLOR OF THE CHAMELEON revisits communist Bulgaria and its secret police for a highly- stylised, absurdist dark commentary. Steve Williams reviews at the Edinburgh Film Festival.

zod
Saturday, June 22, 2013

Man of Steel

The release of MAN OF STEEL coincides with the 75th anniversary of Superman, the world’s most iconic superhero. Warners is betting heavily this time that they got it right, writes Wyndham Wise.

Much Ado About Nothing | TakeOneCFF.com
Thursday, June 20, 2013

Much Ado About Nothing

Joss Whedon’s take on Shakespeare’s rom-com is charming yet forgettable, writes Gavin Midgley.

before
Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Linklater’s “Before” Trilogy

If BEFORE SUNRISE and BEFORE SUNSET are films about the beginnings of fire, BEFORE MIDNIGHT is about how to stoke a blaze, writes Ann Linden.

sif1
Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Summer in February

Jonathan Smith presents SUMMER IN FEBRUARY, based on his own original novel. “A triumph of antiquated posturing and quite unimaginative storytelling,” writes Ed Frost.

bi1
Monday, June 17, 2013

Breathe In

Guy Pearce steals the show in Drake Doremus’ BREATHE IN, the opening night film at the 67th edition of the Edinburgh International Film Festival.

btc
Sunday, June 16, 2013

Behind the Candelabra

Fabulously gay, darling! For about the first half, anyway. And then BEHIND THE CANDELABRA turns into a slightly dreary tale of human weakness and failure, writes Keith Braithwaite.

anglia.ac.uk/openday